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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 4, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the british ambassador to the eu resigns and tells his staff to challenge "muddled thinking" and "speak truth to power" after he resigned ahead of brexit talks. sir ivan rogers strongly criticised the government's preparations for leaving the eu saying senior ministers needed to hear what he called "unvarnished" and "uncomfortable" views. good morning. it's wednesday, january 4th. also this morning: after a paralympian wet herself on a train because the disabled toilet was out of action, the government tells breakfast it will tighten up the rules around facilities for the disabled. a charity warns that a lack of basic care for asthma patients in the uk could "cost lives," as it suggests over three million people are at risk.
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good morning. the pay gap between men and women in their 20s has narrowed to its lowest level ever, but if you're in your 30s or 40s men are still earning much more. why? i'll be finding out. good morning. in sport, a fantastic comeback from arsenal, who came back from 3—0 down with 20 minutes left to draw 3—3 at bournemouth. arsenal stay fourth in the table. good morning. the natural history museum prepares to dismantle dippy the diplodocus. after 100 years in the same spot, the dinosaur is going on tour. and carol has the weather. good morning. it isa it is a cloudy start for england and wales cricket board in with some drizzle. it will brighten up, though, particular central and eastern areas. a cold start for scotla nd eastern areas. a cold start for scotland and northern ireland with some clear skies. some sunshine, if you wintry showers but a keen wind
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down the north sea coast. more details on the weather in 15 minutes. thanks. good morning. first, our main story. britain's outgoing ambassador to the european union, sir ivan rogers, has strongly criticised the government's preparations for brexit. in his resignation letter he said he didn't know what ministers‘ negotiating objectives were and called on his colleagues to challenge what he called muddled thinking. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, reports. sir ivan rogers has been britain's ambassador to the eu for three years and his criticisms about the government's repressions for brexit will be hard to ignore. in his resignation e—mail he says there is a short supply of... and he says... he reveals that even he does not know what the government's negotiating objectives for brexit will be. but it is sir ivan implicit
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and thinly veiled criticism of ministers that is most telling. he urges fellow officials never to be afraid to speak truth to power and to challenge what he calls muddled thinking and ill founded arguments. he says they should support each other in difficult moments when they have to deliver messages that are disagreeable to those who need to hear them. so, disagreeable to those who need to hearthem. so, sir ivan‘s disagreeable to those who need to hear them. so, sir ivan‘s charge is a serious one, that the government isn't ready for brexit and it is ignoring the advice of its diplomats. our political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. how serious is this for the government? he is clearly an incredibly experienced man. he is very experienced. some people want britain to leave the eu. they say he is too experienced, he knows brussels too well and they want to replace him with someone who wants brexit. irrespective of your views on the referendum it is a significant departure for the
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following reasons, part —— in part went the bbc revealed he was suggesting it might take 10 years to get a trade deal. that was based on calls with people from other eu nations. he is therefore saying it is important that people who represent britain challenge muddled thinking by ministers. for me, the most significant thing in this letter is when he says, i quote, we don't know what the government will set as it is negotiating objectives with the eu. this isn't about the detail, it is the broad brush in or out, partially out of the customs you union and the single market. if we are leaving the eu in a few months, the government will have to a nswer months, the government will have to answer this criticism. they will be grateful that mps at westminster don't return until next week, so they cannot be dragged to the house
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of commons to answer questions this week, but it raises questions about how other ministers are handling their negotiations. thank you for that. plenty of questions will arise from that. and in half an hour we'll be speaking to the shadow secretary of state for international trade. that's at 6:40am. meanwhile, the uk's countryside and wildlife could suffer post brexit, according to a cross party committee of mps. farmers could also face a loss of subsidies according to the report by the environmental audit committee. it calls for new laws to ensure existing protections for farming are not weakened once britain leaves the eu. the government says it is committed to safeguarding and improving them. former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides emergency cover for the nhs say they were given just an hour's training to drive under blue lights. a company based in essex called the private ambulance service is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times. the company says the level of training of its staff exceeds the required standards. two thirds of asthma patients in the uk aren't receiving the basic care needed to manage their condition according
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to research by charity asthma uk. they say that although the figures are slightly better than a year ago, almost 3.5 million people are still at risk. the charity has warned that this failing could "cost lives," as michelle roberts reports. being on the right medication and knowing how to use it is vital if you have asthma. so too is having regular checkups and getting tailored advice on how to manage your condition. this year's annual asthma care survey shows most people with asthma are not receiving this basic care, that is around 3.6 million people in the uk. in 2015 in the uk nearly one and a half thousand people died from asthma attacks. the highest level in a decade. according to asthma uk, two in every three asthma deaths could be avoided with better care. most
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patients think the care they receive is satisfactory or excellent, but few get the full package of basic care. nhs england says every asthma patient should be supported to manage their condition and offered regular reviews. and it is notjust medical staff who need to do more, according to asthma uk, who say people with asthma must take responsibility for their own care too. west yorkshire police have carried out further searches overnight after a man was shot and killed by officers during a pre—planned operation. yassar yaqub died on monday evening after police in unmarked vehicles stopped a carjust off the m62 in huddersfield. phil bodmer is close to where the shooting happened. phil, what is the latest in this investigation? good morning, louise. yes, the slip
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road atjunction 2a on the m62 finally reopened before hours after it was closed on monday night following the fatal shooting. the ipcc are investigating circumstances leading to that event. yesterday the man who died was named as 28—year—old yassar yaqub, a father of two from huddersfield. that is to the south—east of the town. last night we understand there were a number of peaceful protest which we re number of peaceful protest which were held in the leeds road and wakefield road areas of bradford. police were deployed to ensure the proteas were peaceful. police say they understand tensions in some communities may be heightened as a result of what happened here on monday night, but they say those protests passed off very peacefully. meanwhile the independent police complaints commission commissioner derek campbell has issued a statement and he as my thoughts are with yassar yaqub's family and those
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affected at this difficult time. although it is early stages of the investigation will be complex and they are appealing for patients from people within the local community. today later we are expecting a postmortem into the victim and also five people still remain in custody in connection with what happened here on monday night —— appealing for patience. the difference in what a woman in her 30s or 40s will earn compared to a man is still growing, according to new research. the resolution foundation study suggests that while the gender gap for people born since the millennium is narrowing, women will still earn significantly less then their male colleagues throughout their careers. it's being reported that the convicted mass murderer, charles manson, has been taken to hospital. media reports say that manson, who is in his 80s, has been moved to a hospital about an hour away from california's corcoran state prison where he is being held. he's serving nine life terms for ordering a wave of killings in the summer of 1969. an earthquake was detected 100 miles from scarborough last night.
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the british geological survey says the tremor, which was in the north sea, happened just before 7pm yesterday evening and had a magnitude of 3.8. wondering if anybody felt that. yeah, if you felt it, let us know. do. a couple who were forced to spend the night in the scottish cairngorms have spoken of their relief at being rescued. robert and cathy elmer were reported missing on sunday night and sheltered in a bivvy bag before rescuers reached them the following day. yesterday, another man was saved from the mountain range, their fourth call—out this year. all right, have a look at this video. heroes come in all shapes and sizes, including extra small in this instance. look at this. urgh! this video captures the moment a chest of drawers falls onto two year old brock shoff just as he was playing in the bedroom. what follows is an impressive feat of cool—headed action and impressive
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strength from his twin brother, bowdy, who rescues him. the boys parents have released the footage to highlight concerns over the safety of children and tall furniture. 0h oh my god. it is amazing and horrifying. it is two minutes long and it takes a while to work it out, but he does work out how to get his brother out of there. he tries to figure out how to lift it, and any figures out he can push it back. it is one of those, isn't it? that is why we gave you a warning, but amazing and terrible video at the same time. look the furniture. —— look after the furniture. janet jackson's given birth to her first child. the younger sister of michaeljackson, who is 50, has named her son eissa. she is said to have had a stress—free delivery. the singer stopped a world tour last april, telling her fans she was planning a family with her husband. congratulations to her. well done. i wonder if people told her about the "be careful of furniture" rule.
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a p pa re ntly the "be careful of furniture" rule. apparently arsenal were singing, "this is embarrassing" when they we re "this is embarrassing" when they were losing. it all turned around. arsenal staged a remarkable comeback from 3—0 down to draw 3—3 at bournemouth in the premier league last night. 0livier giroud's stoppage—time goal completed the fightback. arsenal stay fourth in the table. a 2—1win at crystal palace moved swansea city off the bottom of the table on the day they appointed paul clement as their new head coach. hull city are now bottom, and last night they parted company with their manager mike phelan. the 54—year—old was appointed full time in october. sir andy murray has got his year off to a winning start. the world number one beat france'sjeremy chardy in straight sets to reach the second round of the qatar 0pen. you will notice, did anyone notice anything unusual about what i said at the start? andy murray. not calling him sir. why, 'cause...? he
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is... totally! i am not so sure he is... totally! i am not so sure he is desperate to be called it yet. is... totally! i am not so sure he is desperate to be called it yetlj think occasionally... if he is wearing a suit. 0k, sire andy. he spoke about it, he said when at wimbledon he doesn't want to be known as sir andy, because they might have to put on the scoreboard sir andy murray. he is only 29. laughter i think that's great. are you done? i am done. i think what i was doing is in the technical term "filling in". just walk in, it is fine. 0h, they you go. very nice this morning, isn't it? what have you got? the front of the daily mail, talking about the nhs, they say hospital shouldn't collude with ambulance chasing lawyers and the head of the nhs has warned it yesterday. i rather like this photograph, sir paul mccartney...
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laughter mellow on a day with his daughter. he has got out of the sea and put his towel around her. it is just really cute. i love that. has it got you, that? it has got me this morning. lots of talk about the brexit story this morning, the front of the times, quitting over the brexit, sir ivan rogers, the main story on the telegraph as well, theresa may to pick brexiteer in brussels. at a first—time writer who spent 10 years putting together a book about her father's struggles with dementia and she has won a literary award. a real mixed bag, the papers today. the main story, lunchtime today they say ftse bosses ra ke lunchtime today they say ftse bosses rake in £28,200 each in 2017, so in just, what are we, the fourth day, the same an average worker will earn ina year. the same an average worker will earn in a year. the front of the sun
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talking about an engineer's dream of buying his ideal home in tatters after developers banned him from parking his work van. and after... your top interviewed. yes, all of the quotes inside the paper. your top interviewed. yes, all of the quotes inside the paperlj your top interviewed. yes, all of the quotes inside the paper. i told you that was interesting. you know the main stories. how can i follow that? there is one main story for the business pages. you will note mexico promised to move manufacturing, $1.6 billion factory in mexico, it will no longer do that. tax and regulatory reforms proposed by the president—elect led to its decision to invest instead $700 million in michigan. if you read further down, you will realise those proposed changes included a 35% tax imposed on any cars that were built in mexico, but brought back to the us.
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president—elect donald trump claiming that as a victory for his bring jobs home campaign. but nonetheless, not going down too well with some of the manufacturers who said it could cost them more. very impressive. i am not afraid to ask for help. help me. i am bringing you a story that is desperately sad. it is about paul gascoigne. once hailed asa is about paul gascoigne. once hailed as a national hero, they are now calling his tour around the country, where he gives talks to audiences and it is called victorian freak show. you can't argue with many of the things they say. it is really brutally honest. it is horrible because he was such a hero. he was such a great footballer. yet we are sort of obsessed with his downward spiral. people keep putting a camera at him. we want to hear what he has to say, but he obviously does still face a terrible battle with alcoholism that he has spoken about
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at length. he still struggles with that gets it describes all of the time. on the other side, he needs to earn a living. what will he do? his stories are all he has now. it is sad. thank you. we have talked about this man. he is an ultra marathon runner, and he ran across the gobi desert. this little dog was adopted by him. he ran with him for miles and miles. then he had to leave her behind. he has raised lots of money and she is now back with him in the uk. hejust and she is now back with him in the uk. he just found her and she is now back with him in the uk. hejust found her in the and she is now back with him in the uk. he just found her in the desert. she is called gobi. i was distracted by ben. this is the cutest picture in the papers. the new babies born in bangkok dressed as chickens, as you can see. it is chinese year of the rooster, beginning later this month. i think all babies should be born like that. you definitely win a
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picture of the day. that is the cutest thing i have seen. after all of the bad news, this story. and q. dogs, babies. we were going to have indiana jones, but we will have that later. a little tease, indiana jones for you later. aid shall be started the day for most of us but it will turn colder through the day. fairly cloudy —— a cold start through the day. a fair bit of cloud and some drizzly conditions and patchy rain will stop cold air is feeding in. it will come further south to the course of the day. one or two pockets of frost in the south bursting. there is a bit more cloud around and patchy rain. we have drizzle here and there. nothing too significant. not as cold as it was this time yesterday. six
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celsius in london by the time we get to eight o'clock. as we travel further north, behind the weather front, a cold start. frost around. the odd pocket of fog, but it should not be problematic. a lot of sunshine for the word go. parts of northern ireland singh sunshine. where we have the weather front extending into parts of northern ireland into england and wales, more cloud and drizzle. into the south—west, a cloudy start through the day. the wind is a feature. gusty winds blowing down the north sea. whipping up some big waves. as well, some showers coming onshore, especially in east anglia. some could be wintry. no heatwave in prospect. 1—5. if you are under the cloud in the weather front, 7—8. prospect. 1—5. if you are under the cloud in the weatherfront, 7—8. not as god. as the weather front pushes down towards the south—west, look at the temperature dropping overnight
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—— cold. —20 —3 in towns, be in the countryside, “i! —— cold. —20 —3 in towns, be in the countryside, “1! oh —6, and even lower locally —— —2 or monastery. should not be too much of a problem. the air is dry. a fine day tomorrow for many areas with sunshine. these are the remnants of the weather front across south—west england and parts of the west of northern ireland to producing cloud and spots of rain. later, another weather front will show its hand. looking at the progress of that one, it comes in during thursday into friday. you can see how it pivots and brings rain southwards. before it does, boasting on friday morning, there will be fog around. also some ice and frost. here comes the rain during friday pushing steadily southwards accompanied by gusty winds. behind it, a return to
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showers, and ahead of a bright skies. it will not feel as cold u nless skies. it will not feel as cold unless you are in norwich. elsewhere, ten, 11 or the highest single figures. that leads us into a milder weekend as well. we really have some cold on the way. thank you so have some cold on the way. thank you so much. see you shortly. you might have seen the paralypian anne wafula strike hit the headlines yesterday when she said she was forced to wet herself in a wheelchair on a train because it didn't have a working disabled toilet. it isa it is a really distressing story and she said two was robbed of her dignity. i was embarrassed, humiliated. i felt they had taken away my dignity. i was felt they had taken away my dignity. iwasa felt they had taken away my dignity. i was a nobody, i felt. felt they had taken away my dignity. iwas a nobody, ifelt. ifelt felt they had taken away my dignity. i was a nobody, i felt. i felt as though i did not exist. well, since then the government has told bbc breakfast that it is looking for better ways to enforce the equalities act. and later today, campaigners will call for more accesible facilities such as a changing table and a hoist. at least a quarter of a million
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people in the uk need these, yet only 900 exist. 0ur disability correspondent nikki fox has more. spending a day at the shops is something so many of us do. but for maria and ryan, it is not a pleasurable experience. ryan is autistic and needs a bathroom with the right amount of space and equipment to allow this man to tension. but there are not that many around. —— to change it. tension. but there are not that many around. -- to change it. would you put your mum or your sister on the floor to change them if they were still wearing nappies? would you walk into a public toilet in your bare feet? does that give you some sort of idea of what i have to do? it is this kind of problem that affects at least a quarter of a million people in the uk. this woman can look after her son at home
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because she has all of the kitchen aids. but it is a whole different matter when they leave the house. —— kit she needs. it is hard to find a suitable public toilet. how does that impact you ? suitable public toilet. how does that impact you? very hard. we can't go out for a full day. but there is an answer. a fully accessible bathroom like this. the bathroom of james. there are only 900 of these changes places across the uk. it is absolutely huge. it is the creme de la creme of bathrooms. when i came in here withjosh, my son, the first thing would be to bring the ceiling track hoist over. before it opened, dawn would have to changejosh on toilet floors. that is disgusting. you don't change people on the floor. my son obviously had been through chemo. he got a massive infection risk. at the end of this life for the last two years, he was severely oxygen dependent. shortly
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before he died, josh open this facility. it meant he could rest, which was really important for us, because it meant he could continue to go out and experience life. because it meant he could continue to go out and experience lifem has taken four years for maria to secure the funding for a changing places toilet in her local shopping centre in crawley. they are not cheap. coming in at around £18,000. there is currently no legal obligation to provide one. councils say cuts to funding mean they have had to make tough choices about public facilities. but they are working with local businesses to try to tackle the problem. it is not much from outside at the moment, but this is where the changing place will be. they have every right to be able to toilet in the correct way. so to have this facility is giving them their basic humid rights of being able to go to the toilet in public. but safely, securely, hygienically, and dignified —— human
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rights. towns and cities are beginning to take the changing places on, but there are still a substantial part of the population who can't do the things so many of us who can't do the things so many of us take for granted. real difficulties the people. we will talk about it later. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: he's wowed vistors in london for more than a 100 years, but dippy the dinosaur is set to roam again. you are in charge of saying diplodocus. diplodocus. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the natural history musuem. we are going with diplodocus, we just are. if you have ever been to the natural history museum, a good chance you have stood here and wondered at dippy the diplodocus. he first arrived in 1905. he has wowed
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more than 90 million visitors over that time, it is not. he is about to be dismantled. all 292 bones. a uk two—year tour awaits. it will be quite some undertaking. taking apart the structure without damaging it. how will experts do that? we will be finding out a little later in finding out a little later in finding out a little later in finding out where this replica cast, because that is what it is, where it will be displayed. all of that coming up later. first, the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. the head of lloyd's of london says the insurance giant will announce "within months" where it will create a new european base following brexit. lloyd's insurance market has traded in the capital for more than 300 years, but is now finalising contingency plans to move staff to a subsidary office, depending on the government's negotiations with the eu.
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we've got to have people physically in another country looking after that business, whereas previously they would have been based in london. that is only a small proportion for vogts, but if other businesses have to follow suit, they will be people based outside of london —— burma. i'm sure london will still remain the global heart of insurance globally —— lloyd's. an appeal is due to be held today into the case of a british—iranian woman from hampstead who is being held in an iranian prison on ‘secret charges'. nazanin zaghari ratcliffe was taken out of solitary confinement over christmas, which her husband, richard, says was making her suicidal. she is accused of plotting against the iranian government and the husband says she is being used as a bargaining chip in a diplomatic row. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is running normally, it seems, this morning,
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but a reminder that transport for london's rail service is suspended between brentwood and shenfield till may for works. southern trains still have a disrupted service because of strike action. let's take a look at the a1 holloway road — it's closed near upper holloway station for works for the next few days. meanwhile, it's going to be busy round there as part of the diversion route, tufnell park road, is partly blocked by a burst water main. and tooley street closed eastbound at london bridge for major works too. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. a milder morning follows a mild at night. a little bit damp for some of us as well. we have a cloudy start through the day. some outbreaks of rain. they should be fairly short lived and not all of us be fairly short lived and not all of us will see them. fairly light rain where they do fall. that cloud should melt away early today and leaving us with beautiful winter sunshine. temperatures up to seven 01’ sunshine. temperatures up to seven or eight degrees, possibly even above that. under the clear skies
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tonight, the temperatures fall away pretty quickly, and we are expecting a widespread frost. probably some fog patches and freezing fog is a possibility. possibly minus two degrees especially in more rural parts. it is a frosty and icy start tomorrow. whether leaving extra time if you are travelling anywhere to scrape your windscreen. lots of sunshine on the way, with highs of five celsius. still feeling cold in the sunshine. heading into friday, a different day. much cloudier as a band of rain sinks southwards. we will not see that later on. that clears on saturday morning leaving us clears on saturday morning leaving us with a dry weekend with sunny spells and feeling slightly marred as well. those temperatures reaching double figures again —— model. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. exactly 6:30am on wednesday,
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january fourth. 0n breakfast this morning: would your partner support your new year resolution to cut down on alcohol? we'll discuss the findings of a survey that suggests men wouldn't. also this morning: the gender pay gap is rising for women in their 30s and 40s. we'll be finding out what that means for the next generation. mum, you've got a dry—cleaning label hanging out. you what? when was the last time yours was cleaned? the rude but not crude cop show, no offence, returns to our screens tonight. joanna scanlon will tell us why home life takes a back seat when she plays the loud—mouth detective. all that still to come for you this morning. but now a summary of this morning's main news. britain's outgoing ambassador to the eu, sir ivan rogers, has strongly criticised the government's preparations for brexit.
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in his resignation letter, he urged his colleagues to continue to challenge what he called muddled thinking and ill—founded arguments. he added that ministers need to hear the "unvarnished" views from europe ahead of brexit. and in about ten minutes we'll be speaking to the shadow secretary of state for international trade. that's at 6:40am. a cross party committee of mps says that brexit poses a significant threat to the uk environment and they are calling for new laws to ensure existing protections are not weakened. in their report, the environmental audit committee says that farmers are also facing brexit concerns including loss of subsidies and tariffs on exports. here's our environment correspondent matt mcgrath. from the cleanliness of britain's beaches to the protection of birds and habitats, much of the uk's environmental and wildlife legislation is rooted in eu directives and regulations. the government has said it will transfer many of these into uk law when britain leaves the eu but recognises that about one third of the existing rules will be difficult to incorporate.
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to ensure there is no weakening of safeguards, the environmental audit committee says a new environmental protection act should be in place before brexit is complete. european law protects huge amounts of the uk's environment, farming and countryside, and the process of leaving the eu presents a huge risk to all of those protections, which is why, in our report, we are calling for a new environmental protection act so that when we leave the eu, we are no worse off protected than we are at the moment. the mps say that brexit also threatens british farmers, with the removal of eu subsidies, the possibility of tariffs on exports and greater competition from other countries. in response to the report, the government says the uk has a long history of wildlife and environmental protections and is committed to safeguarding and protecting these. former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides emergency cover for the nhs say
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they were given just an hour's training to drive under blue lights. a company based in essex called the private ambulance service is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times. the company says the level of training of its staff exceeds the required standards. 0verfive million people in the uk currently receive treatment for asthma, but up to two thirds of them are not being given the care needed to manage their condition. asthma uk, which commissioned the research, says says that in 20151,500 people died from the disease, the highest number in a decade. the charity says both the nhs and sufferers must take joint responsibility for their health. west yorkshire police have carried out further searches overnight after a man was shot and killed by officers during a pre—planned operation. yassar yaqub died on monday evening after police in unmarked vehicles stopped a carjust off the m62 in huddersfield. the independent police complaints commission is probing the discovery of a gun in mr yaqub's car. it's being reported
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that the convicted mass murderer, charles manson, has been taken to hospital. media reports say that manson, who is in his eighties, has been moved to a hospital about an hour away from the state prison where he is being held. he's serving nine life terms for ordering a wave of killings in the summer of 1969. an earthquake was detected 100 miles from scarborough last night. the british geological survey says the tremor, which was in the north sea, happened just before 7pm yesterday evening and had a magnitude of 3.8. we asked if anybody felt it. as yet, brexiteer, no. just having a little chat and no one has said the earth move for them, or anything like that. heroes come in all shapes and sizes, including extra small in this instance.
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before we show you, we need to tell you it is a moment when a chest of drawers falls onto a two —year—old child, but the child is ok — it is worth looking at the pictures. this video captures the moment a chest of drawers falls onto two—year—old brock shoffjust as he was playing in the bedroom. what follows is an impressive feat of cool—headed action and impressive strength from his twin brother, bowdy, who rescues him. the boys parents have released the footage to highlight concerns over the safety of children and tall furniture. and again, just to say, they both 0k, it is so watchable and also un— watchable at the same time. the second wobble, when it was about to go back down. they are ok. and it is a serious thing, you need to make short... he was lucky his brother was there. that is why it they give you those things, a little tag at the back with a screw thread, so you
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can screw it in. to attach it to the wall. one of the reasons why. oh, dear. have you done that, though? yeah. oh, ok. you are a terrible mother. laughter i don't need you to tell me that. shall i change the subject? yes! a story of heroics from last night if you are an arsenal fan. it was going well for bournemouth, but everything changed. a remarkable comeback from arsenal last night who scored three goals in the last 20 minutes to earn a 3—3 draw at bournemouth. eddie howe's side were in complete control as they led 3—0. ryan fraser scoring their third goal but arsenal fought back and a stoppage—time header from 0livier giroud completed the turnaround. maybe they should have gone for a fourth. when you're 3—0 down you have as well to acknowledge the quality of your team well to acknowledge the quality of yourteam in
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well to acknowledge the quality of your team in order to come back to 3-3, but your team in order to come back to 3—3, but not everybody can do that, so... mixed feelings tonight, but you have as well to recognise that my team showed great mental strength. a 2—1win at crystal palace moved swansea city off the bottom of the premier league table on the day they appointment paul clement as their new head coach. the former derby boss watched from the dug—out in the second half as swansea won their first game in nearly a month. angel rangel scored the winner two minutes from time to lift the swans to within a point of safety. stoke city ended a run of five games without a win by beating watford 2—0, their goals coming from ryan shawcross and peter crouch mike phelan last night became the latest premier league manager to be sacked with his hull city side bottom of the premier league. phelan replaced steve bruce on a temporary basis before the start of the season and was
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appointed permanently in october. despite winning their opening two league games, hull have won just once since, prompting a change at the kcom stadium. world number one sir andy murray has got 2017 off to a winning start — six words i never thought i would say — after reaching the second round of the qatar 0pen. the two—time champion in doha comfortably dispatched france's jeremy chardy in straight sets. he'll play austrian gerald melzer in round two. former world and super league champions bradford bulls have been liquidated after the club's administrator rejected a bid to save them. the bulls entered administration in novemberfor the third time in four years. despite the liquidation, a new incarnation of the club will remain in rugby league's second tier for the upcoming season but with a 12—point deduction. england rugby union head coach eddiejones says dylan hartley will captain england during the six nations so long as he proves his fitness. hartley is currently serving a suspension after being sent off for club side northampton. his six week ban will end before england play france early next month.
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will, dylan is doing everything right to become captain at the moment. he came to the camps, he has worked hard. a pre— requisite to get to the england side is to be very fit. and not playing games, it means he has got to go and and unbelievably stringent fitness program over the next five or six weeks, and he is doing that, so he is putting himself in the best position to continue as captain. ready for a little bit of understatement? gb taekwondo say they have reservations about double 0lympic champion jade jones taking part in the channel a programme thejump. you can understand why, though, can't you ? ..following serious injuries to some competitors on last year's show. jones, who receives funding from uk sport, has been spoken to about the risks involved in the programme, which teaches people to ski jump. lots of other things, too. cyclist sir bradley wiggins and paralympian kadeena cox are among the figures from sport also taking part. it's interesting, isn't it, because
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over the years more and more sports people seem to be wanting to get involved with the program as well, haven't they? you have to be tough to do that show, because the training is immense. very, very competitive. and with a massive insurers premium! yes, yes. 6:40am exactly. the man who was supposed to be a key figure in the negotiations for getting britain out of europe has not only resigned from his job, but he's also written a letter, strongly criticising the way the government is preparing for brexit. the uk's outgoing ambassador to the eu, sir ivan rogers, unexpectedly quit early and has urged his colleagues to challenge "muddled thinking". joining us now from westminster is barry gardiner, shadow secretary of state for international trade. good morning to you, thank you for your time this morning on breakfast. now, sir ivan has made way, one person in place for the brexit process , person in place for the brexit process, it seems a sensible option, doesn't it? well, look!
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process, it seems a sensible option, doesn't it? well, look i think government policy appears to be to shout down anybody who tells some things that they don't want to hear. i regret that. i think often when you shoot the messenger you end up shooting yourself in the foot. i think that the government needs to be careful now in ensuring that we have the experience that is required in order to conduct successful negotiations. 0ne can't simply surround oneself with people who tell you what you want to hear. you have to know what the reality is of the other side of the negotiations, ta ke the other side of the negotiations, take that the other side of the negotiations, ta ke that on—boa rd the other side of the negotiations, take that on—board and then negotiate the toughest and best deal for the uk. i understand what you're saying, but he has appeared to have criticised the pm's trade position, so don't you need someone who stands with the government on this? it is 0k to say, this is the point of view, but it is an important negotiation, but they have to sing
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from the same sheet? look, in any negotiation it is important that, you're quite right, people are united in achieving the best result for the country, but sir ivan is a man who has been private secretary to the prime minister, to the chancellor, he has been the head of public affairs at barclays, citibank, he was head of tax at the treasury, this is an extremely distinguished civil servant that we are talking about, and somebody who knew the european union particularly well. he had actually been chef to cabernet to the vice president of the european union. when he says, look, this is what these people are thinking, this is what these people are trying to do, it you take that as intelligence that you need to factor into your own negotiating
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position. and it really is, i think, very dangerous for the government simply to rubbish people like that. they should listen carefully, they should take on board. and what we now need is to ensure that whoever it is that replaces sir ivan is someone it is that replaces sir ivan is someone with an equally distinguished record of public service. i hate seeing the civil service. i hate seeing the civil service either politicised or turned into "yes people", i think we need someone into "yes people", i think we need someone with a distinguished record, as sir ivan had, and someone who really has that fundamental grasp of how our partners in this negotiation from europe are going to be thinking. we need the best dealfor the uk. 0k, thinking. we need the best dealfor the uk. ok, can i ask you one more because you mentioned the civil service, and the former ukip leader, iam sure service, and the former ukip leader, i am sure you know, nigel farage, says the foreign office needs a
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clearer because, from his point of view, there are too many remain supporters making the job view, there are too many remain supporters making thejob more difficult. what would you say to that? look, civil servants, whatever their private views might be, act in their private views might be, act in the best interests of the public and in accordance with government policy. we have for many years in this country had a civil service that operates in —— impartially and irrespective of their own private views. to try and politicised the civil service is really scandalous. it is the sort of refuge of a scoundrel. what we need to do is recognise and respect the experience that our civil servants have, to ta ke that our civil servants have, to take note of it and to ensure that we then i able to negotiate a deal thatis we then i able to negotiate a deal that is going to make us more prosperous in this country outside of the eu. there is no point in us
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ending up going through these negotiations ignoring everybody who says it may be difficult, it may ta ke says it may be difficult, it may take time, and then finding that, "0h, take time, and then finding that, "oh, well, we might be poorer, we might be out of work, but actually at least we are in charge of our demise," that is not what we want and not what anyone who voted to leave the eu wants. we must be more prosperous at the end of this, not poorer. thank you for your time on brea kfast poorer. thank you for your time on breakfast is morning. it is good to talk to you. iam i am getting the time it right this year, that is my new year's resolution. let's talk to carol. it will be sunny today, eventually, and frosty tonight. a widespread frost. we have this weather front sinking southwards and taking more cloud and patchy rain with it. a cold feed is
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coming in behind. the wind will come from a northerly direction through the day. this front continues to drift south and cold air will follow behind it. first thing this morning, a lot of cloud. some pockets of frost in dorset and hampshire. by no means widespread. the cloud is producing the odd spot of patchy rain or drizzle. into northern england, cloud around but also clear skies. it is a cold start across parts of scotland with frost. wintry showers across shetland and aberdeenshire. across northern ireland, the south seas more cloud. cold with clearer skies in the north—east. that is where we have the weather front draped across wales and into the midlands. a lot of cloud with patchy rain. into the south—west, a cloudy start for you as well. the other thing you will notice is the keen wind coming down
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the north sea coastline. that will whip up big waves and bush showers in across part of the coastline, especially through north norfolk. sunshine will follow behind with temperatures of five at best in the sunshine. where we have bigger cloud towards the west, seven or eight. under clear skies by evening, temperatures shootdown, represented by the blues in towns and cities. -2' by the blues in towns and cities. —2, but in the countryside, even lower. possibly even minus seven. widespread frost to start the day tomorrow. some patchy fog is possible. tomorrow promises to be a fine day with a fair bit of sunshine. there will be bits of cloud floating around, and the re m na nts of cloud floating around, and the remnants of the weather front affecting parts of south—east england, the west of northern ireland, and splashes of rain. later, we see this next system introducing more wet and windy weather. the weather front coming from the north and pivoting around
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and pushing southwards. before that happens, it will be a cult start on friday morning with frost. we are more likely to see fog patches as well. the front starts to push steadily southwards accompanied by blustery winds. behind it, still some showers and a wee bit of brightness. but unless you are in norwich, it will feel much milder thenit norwich, it will feel much milder then it will in the next couple of days. thank you. a bitter bid cold on the way. good to know. we need a bit of information from carol. men and women earn roughly the same when they're in their 20s, but men are still earning more in their 30s and 40s. ben is taking a look at why. good morning. yesterday we spoke about women's products costing more than men when it came to things like toiletries. today is about pay. the resolution foundation has been looking at average pay for men and women over the last a0 years.
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and they say the gender pay gap is closing, but not for everyone. it depends how old you are. for the baby boomers, working in the ‘60s and ‘70s, men earned substantially more than women for doing the same job. the gap was around 16%. in the ‘80s, or generation x, that gap has narrowed to 9%. and fast—forward to today, those in their 20s will find the pay gap still exists — but it's at its lowest ever level, just 5%. but why is it so hard to eradicate? laura gardiner is senior policy analyst for the resolution foundation. good morning. as we highlighted, there has been some progress. that gap is narrowing. we are still not equal pay, though? as you highlighted, the progress in the early stage of careers, when people are in their20s, early stage of careers, when people are in their 20s, it is something we should celebrate. for millennial is,
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the gender pay gap is mist half compared to the generation who came before. there is still a pay gap and we need to think about why that is, but one thing we might highlight is that although more women are graduating with degrees than men, there is still a significant pay gap between male and female graduates. it has not shifted that much over time. really good progress in the early stage of careers, but still more to understand and more to do to really eradicate that gap. is there an element of legacy problems? you can see why people in their 40s up to 60s, they are earning different amounts. but for people sitting out today doing an identicaljob, whether they are a man or woman, why are they not pay the same? the gender pay gap does notjust measure identicaljobs. includes the fact that men and women do differentjobs at different stages of careers, a mix between equal pay, different
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choices and constrain choices. you talk about the 40s, 50s and 60s, but although we are celebrating the closing of the gender pay gap, the generation born since 1980, it suggest the old challenges around when women start to have children really enjoyed the young women today to the extent that they can expect a significant lifetime earnings penalty compared to them our counterparts. those other problems. but what can businesses do to get rid of the gap? we should recognise the great progress we have made down to changes in government policy on things like maternity pay. the really big challenges remain around when women have children, and that is what will hit hard for the millennial generation. we need to think about the penalties associated
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with part—time working, which is all too often a choice made by women due too often a choice made by women due to things like high childcare costs. they might start on the salary that is the same as men, but progression and promotion is hard to come by. we need to change that in business. so that business and employee response, is there is social response to this as well, but maybe more men should consider taking the burden of childcare more so it is notjust the onus on the women to take time off work and not be working and therefore suffered that gap later in life? each family makes its own choices and no business or government to get in the way of that. but nearly half of women would be upfor that. but nearly half of women would be up for sharing their parental leave with their partner, and legislation was brought in last year so that could happen. but the take—up has been small. obviously it will take time. but there is more appetite among both men and women for a more equal sharing of child—rearing responsibilities. we
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have some policy change in place, but progress is still to be made to embed that and increase parental leave in particular. thank you for explaining all of that. that is all from me for now. after seven o'clock, i will have the christmas figures. thank you. it is interesting to get the nitty—gritty of that. dinosaurs haven't roamed the earth for around 65 million years, but one by the name of dippy is about to embark on something of a road trip. he will travel around museums across the country, but first, there's the small matter of dismantling him. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is with him now. good morning. i remember this so well from a childhood. if you have ever been to the natural history museum in london, and more than 5 million people every year do that, there is a good chance you have stood where i'm standing now and looked up at dippy the diplodocus. he or she, nobody really knows,
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arrived in 1905, and has been on display in this, this hall, in the museum since 1979. but today is the last date you will be able to see dippy in this spot. the dismantling process is about to get under way before a uk tour, which will last for two years. before a uk tour, which will last for two yea rs. before before a uk tour, which will last for two years. before we find out how they will take dippy down, here area how they will take dippy down, here are a few facts and figures delivered by some visitors to the museum. # everybody everybody walked the dinosaur # 0pened the door, get on the floor... # dippy is made up of 292 bones. dippy is a plaster cast replica of a skeleton found in wyoming in the usa in 1988. dippy has been viewed by
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more than 90 million visitors. dippy will be going on a two—year tour around the uk and will be replaced here by the skeleton of a blue while. we are a little sad because dippy sort of feels like an old friend, part of the family. # i walked a dinosaur #. it gives people an opportunity to see an amazing dinosaur that perhaps they would not be able to see at all. # open the door, get on the floor # everybody walked the dinosaur... #. lorraine is the head of conservation at the museum. you have the huge task of taking dippy apart and taking dippy around the uk. where do you begin? we start taking no mike dunn first removing this glass barrier. then we come in with a whole load of scaffolding. we need to get all over the skeleton, over
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292 individual pieces. we are starting at the tail end and will remove the towel. we will, with the head end. —— tail. it is like a string of pearls. we will start to and read them. then we will come into the middle section where we have these large legs and feet and all of the rib cage, and some of these plaster of paris beats weigh a lot, so we have the scaffolding to help us. each one will come down and will photograph is a noted condition, and then we will carefully la bel condition, and then we will carefully label it. the uk tour gets under way and the dates and places of that tour should be on the screen now. why have you chosen the various places, and how hard will be to put dippy together again in all of those places. all of those pieces have a compelling story. dippy will be free at the point of entry and each place is excited to have nomad. we will do
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a whole series of events reaching millions of people. schools, adults, different groups. we are really excited about that. we have chosen eight venues and there will really be great in terms of dippy being an ambassadorfor be great in terms of dippy being an ambassador for nature and natural history. that'll be great. we have a three—year tour essentially starting. it will be a blue while replacing dippy in this main hall of the natural history museum. what an undertaking, to take that apart. —— blue while. it is like flatpack times a million. good luck. thank you. thank you forjoining the debate about how to pronounce diplodocus. i was told under no circumstances it was diplodocus. dipladocus? 0r circumstances it was diplodocus. dipladocus? or you can vote online. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. the head of lloyd's of london says the insurance giant will announce "within months" where it will create a new european base following brexit. lloyd's insurance market has traded in the capital for more than 300 years, but is now finalising contingency plans to move staff to a subsidiary office, depending on the government's negotiations with the eu. we've got to have people physically in another country looking after that business, whereas previously they would have been based in london. that is only a small proportion for lloyd's, but if other businesses have to follow suit, that means there will be people based outside of london. but i'm sure london will still remain the global heart of insurance globally. an appeal is due to be held in an iranian court today against the imprisonment of a woman from hampstead, who's been locked up there since march last year. nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who's a british iranian charity
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worker, is accused of plotting against the iranian government. but her husband says details of the charges have been kept secret. he claims his wife is being used as a bargaining chip in a diplomatic row. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is running normally, it seems, this morning, but a reminder that transport for london's rail service is suspended between brentwood and shenfield till may for works. southern trains still have a disrupted service because of strike action. let's take a look at the a1 holloway road — it's closed near upper holloway station for works for the next few days. meanwhile, it's going to be busy round there as part of the diversion route, tufnell park road, is partly blocked by a burst water main. and another burst water main. that road closed because of flooding. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. a milder morning follows a milder night. a little bit damp for some of us as well. we have a cloudy start through the day.
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some outbreaks of rain. they should be fairly short—lived, and not all of us will see them. fairly light rain where they do fall. that cloud should melt away early today and leave us with beautiful winter sunshine. temperatures up to seven or eight degrees, possibly even above that. under the clear skies tonight, the temperatures fall away pretty quickly, and we are expecting a widespread frost. probably some fog patches, and freezing fog is a possibility. possibly —2 degrees, especially in more rural parts. it is a frosty and icy start tomorrow. worth leaving extra time if you are travelling anywhere to scrape your windscreen. lots of sunshine on the way, with highs of five celsius. still feeling cold in the sunshine. heading into friday, a different day altogether. much cloudier as a band of rain sinks southwards. we will not see that later on. that clears on saturday morning, leaving us with a dry weekend with sunny spells and feeling slightly milder as well. those temperatures reaching double figures again.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning, it's wednesday january 4. also this morning: after a paralympian wet herself on a train because the disabled toilet was out of action — the government tells breakfast it will tighten up the rules around facilities for the disabled. men are more likely to disrupt their partner's attempts to tackle a dryjanuary according to a survey by charity drinkaware. how did the high street fare this christmas? next is the first retailer to reveal its christmas sales figures — i'll have the details. in sport, a fantastic comeback from arsenal who came back from 3—0 down with 20 minutes left to draw 3—3 at bournemouth. arsenal stay fourth in the table. dippy the diplodocus has been on
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display here at the natural history museum in london since 1905 but is about to be dismantled before a uk tour gets under way. how do you take aparta tour gets under way. how do you take apart a 292 bones skeleton? we will be finding out. and carol has the weather. good morning. for england and wales, at cloudy start with patchy rain exceptin at cloudy start with patchy rain except in the north where we have sunshine and at touch of frost. scotland, sunny and frosty, northern ireland, a bit of both. a keen wind is blowing down the north sea coastline. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. britain's outgoing ambassador to the european union, sir ivan rogers, has strongly criticised the government's preparations for brexit. in his resignation letter he said he didn‘t know what ministers‘ negotiating objectives were and called on his colleagues to challenge what he called muddled thinking. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale, reports. sir ivan rogers has been britain‘s
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ambassador to the eu for three years, and his criticisms about the government‘s preparations for brexit will be hard to ignore. in his resignation e—mail, he says there is a short supply of: and he says: he reveals that even he does not know what the government‘s negotiating objectives for brexit will be. but it is sir ivan‘s implicit and thinly veiled criticism of ministers that is most telling. he urges fellow officials never to be afraid to speak truth to power, and to challenge what he calls muddled thinking and ill—founded arguments. he says they should support each other in difficult moments when they have to deliver messages that are disagreeable to those who need to hear them. so, sir ivan‘s charge is a serious one — that the government isn‘t ready
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for brexit and it is ignoring the advice of its diplomats. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. how difficult position does this put the government in? a very difficult one. diplomats are expected to be diplomatic, that should be a key pa rt diplomatic, that should be a key part of that to —— job description. the resignation letter from part of that to —— job description. the resignation letterfrom sir ivan rogers was far from diplomatic and it gives the government difficulties on several fronts. firstly, it gives the government difficulties on severalfronts. firstly, how do they replace him? the process still isn‘t clear. a timetable for the replacement are still isn‘t clear at the clock is ticking. to reason they will be pressing that button to start the process of leaving the eu injusta start the process of leaving the eu injust a few start the process of leaving the eu in just a few months‘ time.
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secondly, sir ivan was, from the backroom, thrust into the limelight ina way backroom, thrust into the limelight in a way he clearly didn‘t like. i think anyone else wanted to take that role will be under no illusion that role will be under no illusion that their position will be scrutinised like never before. let me dissuade some well—qualified candidates. the third in years, the key passage which you mentioned in this resignation letter which is of course the person meant to represent us, this most seniorfigure, is saying that the big picture, not the detail, the big picture, still hasn‘t been settled. he doesn‘t know what the government‘s strategy will be and his replacement will have to find out pretty quickly and the government will be delighted that this resignation letter if it was going to come at all, at least came
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when mps are not here at westminster and can‘t call ministers to account. there is a very serious accusation to say the government isn‘t yet prepared brexit. and in ten minutes we‘ll be speaking to the mp anne—marie trevelyan, who‘s from change britain — the campaign to make a success of britain‘s departure from the eu. meanwhile, the uk‘s countryside and wildlife could suffer post brexit, according to a cross party committee of mps. farmers could also face a loss of subsidies according to the report by the environmental audit committee. it calls for new laws to ensure existing protections for farming are not weakened once britain leaves the eu. the government says it is committed to safeguarding and improving them. former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides emergency cover for the nhs, say they were given just an hour‘s training to drive under blue lights. a company based in essex called the ‘private ambulance service‘ is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times. the company says the level of training of its staff exceeds the required standards. there is more on this on the
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victoria de the sheer programme later on. —— derbyshire. two thirds of asthma patients in the uk aren‘t receiving the basic care needed to manage their condition according to research by charity asthma uk. they say that although the figures are slightly better than a year ago, almost three and a half million people are still at risk. the charity has warned that this failing could cost lives, as michelle roberts reports. west yorkshire police have carried out further searches overnight after a man was shot and killed by officers during a pre—planned operation. yassar yaqub, died on monday evening, after police in unmarked vehicles stopped a carjust off the m62 in huddersfield. phil bodmer is close to where the shooting happened — phil what is the latest in this investigation? we are learning more about what
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happened and who died? indeed. this is the expert sleep atjunction 2a of the m62 which you can see now is free—flowing. it opened at about seven pm after it was closed after the fatal police shooting when officers stopped a number of vehicles just officers stopped a number of vehiclesjust on the officers stopped a number of vehicles just on the curb as the motorway drops down. we now know that a 28—year—old yassar yaqub from huddersfield was fatally injured during that shooting. he is a father of two and the ip cc, the independent police complaints commission, are investigating this as they do in all police shootings. last night they said a firearm was discovered in the car that yassar yaqub was travelling in. the ip cc
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also go want to say it is a difficult and complex investigation and they are asking for people‘s patience as that is under way. they say, though, they are making progress. as you mentioned last night, there were a number of spontaneous processes. 0ne night, there were a number of spontaneous processes. one of them was in the leeds road area of rights that. —— bradford. police say it was low— key that. —— bradford. police say it was low—key and peaceful. police acknowledge that tensions in some communities as a result of what happened here on monday may be running high at the moment. also, police searches were carried out in a number of locations in huddersfield although officers won‘t disclose what those locations are. we are expecting a postmortem today on the victim and five people remain in cut to —— custody helping police with their enquiries. high street favourite next
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is the first big retailer to release it‘s christmas figures — and they‘ve not been quite as good as hoped — ben is here... the online directory did well at up why 5%. the post— christmas sales, what they do call the end of christmas sale was done by 7% is a bit worried that it has had to cut prices to get people to buy stuff and still the sales are down by 7%. for the year as a whole, you expect profits to come in at about 4% lower than thought that the two interesting things to the year ahead talk about inflation and we have discussed this before, the cost of that starting to filter through to our pockets. it is worried we will have less money to spend so sales will suffer and it also thinks that
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prices will start going up because of the weak pound. a lot of stuff from overseas. it thinks prices could go up by about 5%. not a great christmas, some glimmers of hope, of course, on the online and directory business but it is now worried about the year ahead with inflation filtering through. the difference in what a woman in her 30s or 40s will earn, compared to a man is still growing according to new research. the resolution foundation study suggests that while the gender gap for people born since the millennium is narrowing, women will still earn significantly less then their male colleagues throughout their careers. it‘s being reported that the convicted mass murderer, charles manson, has been taken to hospital. media reports say that manson, who is in his eighties, has been moved to a hospital about an hour away from the state prison where he is being held. manson, who was sentenced to life in prison, directed his followers to murder seven people in august 1969. an earthquake was detected 100 miles from scarborough last night.
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janet jackson‘s given birth to her first child. the younger sister of michaeljackson, who is 50, has named her son, eissa. she is said to have had a stress—free delivery. the singer stopped a world tour last april, telling her fans she was planning a family with her husband. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to 713. sir ivan rogers hasjust resigned. in his resignation letter he urged collea g u es in his resignation letter he urged colleagues from brussels to challenge muddled thinking and in —— and ill founded arguments. joining us and ill founded arguments. joining us from westminster is anne—marie trevelya n us from westminster is anne—marie trevelyan who sported brexit. i am sure you have seen trevelyan who sported brexit. i am sure you have seen nick clegg are saying this is a body blow to the government. how do you see it?|j
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saying this is a body blow to the government. how do you see it? i was able to read to the resignation letter overnight. i think he makes it clear that as he was planning to retire in october of this year and his number two sean morgan was planning to go to the welsh government civil service he felt, andi government civil service he felt, and i agree with him, that we should have a full team that will take us through the whole two—year brexit negotiation process and he feels it is right to step off now that the prime minister can get a team in place it will take us right through. i understand why you are trying to deflect attention from what he said ina deflect attention from what he said in a letter because some of it is pretty harsh, talking about model inking, basically saying there is no preparation —— muddled thinking. that is a stark warning, isn‘t it? preparation —— muddled thinking. that is a stark warning, isn't it?|j agree with him in part. someone who was active on the brexit side right up was active on the brexit side right up untiljune or back in february when sir ivan was tried to negotiate a deal with david cameron so that those of us on the brexit side might be persuaded that leaving the eu
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com pletely be persuaded that leaving the eu completely wasn‘t necessary because the eu understood that britain needed a very different relationship. there was no discussion or success in the negotiation which is why so many people across britain voted to leave. the reality was that throughout that time there was no activity in whitehall to really try and prepare for what was bluntly a 50-50 and prepare for what was bluntly a 50—50 chance of the british people voting out. when theresa may came in as prime minister in the summer, there had been very little thinking in whitehall about brexit. that is true. he is right. prime minister to reason they have spent the summer making sure that whitehall turned itself around —— theresa may, and looking at in detail what brexit means that each new department. she has created three new department ready to go forward as article 50 is triggered in the next couple of months. is a sir ivan rogers what he says that the people in government don‘t like to hear the difficult truths about brexit? it is not howl
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would say it. civil servants have an important play —— part to play to set out their views and experience on how certain policy issues might be driven forward. it is then politicians who need to take that forward. it is what the prime minister is doing, she has pulled together some amazing people from externally, the civil service, sir ivan had spent time working in a bank so he had external experience. we have people who are going to bring enormous different talents to the table as we move forward into the table as we move forward into the detailed negotiations after we trigger article 50. he is a big loss, isn‘t he? he is an experienced diplomat and knows everybody. he knows the corridors of power. his knowledge and experience will be missed. as with any civil servant who has been working for our great nation for any length of time decide they want to step off the treadmill
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and take up perhaps private sector or retirement, we don‘t know but the reality is we have an amazing team. it is world—renowned, our diplomatic corps and those who work within the treasury and other departments. i have no doubt the prime minister has a group of people she can choose from who will be part of the process all the way through the next couple of years as we get to the point of actually reaching brexit. thank you for talking to us. it is looking frosty this morning. especially this coming night, it will be very frosty. most of us will see a frost away from the coasts. todayit see a frost away from the coasts. today it will be signing for most. we have a weather front moving steadily southwards and heading in the direction of the south—west. it is bringing a fair bit of cloud and some patchy rain and drizzle. behind it, we have colder airfeeding in and also quite a strong wind coming
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from the north. down the north sea coastline. across southern counties this morning, a lot of cloud around. in dorset, some holes in the cloud. the generally not as cold as it was this time yesterday. you can see the front producing the cloud and odd spot of drizzle. into northern england and most of scotland, back under clear skies, it is a cold and frosty start with wintry showers in shetland and aberdeenshire. the north—eastern parts of northern ireland, some sunshine. but the rest of northern ireland heading into wales and the midlands, that is where we have the weather front. more cloud and patchy rain or drizzle. south—west england, variable amounts of cloud with brighter skies. as the front pushes towards the south—west, it will brighten behind it and toad caught behind it with patchy rain going without fun. there is a keen wind,
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so if you‘re walking along the shore, it will be cold. some large waves and under the cloud in the south, not as cold. tonight under clear skies, look at the blue hue in the charts. it will turn cold quickly. there will be a widespread frost. temperatures in towns and cities offering around freezing or blow away from the coast. in a countryside, much lower, minus six degrees. locally, minus seven degrees. locally, minus seven degrees. a widespread frost. there may be isolated pockets of fog, which will be freezing. tomorrow, not a bad day for most. breezy danny north sea coastline, but nothing like today. a lot of sunshine. 0ut towards the west, we see the signs of our next weather front coming in and introducing wet and windy weather. that is courtesy of the weather. that is courtesy of the weather front pushing down towards the south. before it does, it will be frosty, and we will also see more fog. here comes the rain. blustery
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around it, right behind it, but with around it, right behind it, but with a few showers. unless you are in norwich, it‘ll be a mild day, and that will lead us into mild weekend as well. i know you wanted to know about the weekend, and it will be mild. excellent news. iwill remove a layer at the weekend. before then, the icy blue hue. thank you. the government has told bbc breakfast that it‘s looking at better ways to ensure there are more disabled toilets available. it‘s after pa ralympian anne wafula strike revealed she wet herself in a wheelchair because her train didn‘t have a working disabled toilet. it isa it is a distressing story. later today, campaigners are calling for better changing facililities for the quarter of a million people in the uk who need them. 0ur disability correspondent nikki fox has more. spending a day at the shops is something so many of us do. but for maria and ryan, it is not a pleasurable experience. ryan is autistic, and needs a bathroom with the right amount of space and equipment to allow his mum to change him.
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but there are not that many around. would you be prepared to put your mum or your sister on the floor to change them if they were still wearing nappies? would you walk into a public toilet in your bare feet? does that give you some sort of idea of what i have to do? it is this kind of problem that affects at least a quarter of a million people in the uk. this woman can look after her son, adam, at home, because she has all of the kit she needs. but it is a whole different matter when they leave the house. it is 1.5 hours‘ round trip to find a suitable public toilet. how does that impact you? very hard. we can‘t go out for a full day in bury. but there is an answer. a fully accessible bathroom like this. the bathroom of dreams! there are only 900 of these changing
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places across the uk. it is absolutely huge. it is the creme de la creme of bathrooms. when i came in here withjosh, my son, when he was alive, the first thing would be to bring the ceiling track hoist over. but before it opened, dawn would have to changejosh on toilet floors. that is just disgusting. you don‘t change people on the floor. my son obviously had been through chemo. he had a massive infection risk. at the end of this life, for the last two years, he was severely oxygen dependent. shortly before he died, josh opened this facility. it meant he could rest his spine, which was really important for us, because it meant he could continue to go out and experience life. it has taken four years for maria to secure the funding for a changing places toilet in her local shopping centre in crawley. they are not cheap, coming in at around £18,000. there is currently no legal obligation to provide one. councils say cuts to funding mean
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they have had to make tough choices about public facilities. but they are working with local businesses to try to tackle the problem. it is not looking much from outside at the moment, but this is where the crawley changing place will be. they have every right to be able to toilet in the correct way. so to have this facility is giving them their basic human rights of being able to go to the toilet in public, but safely, securely, hygienically, and dignified. there is no easy route to getting a changing places toilet. towns and cities are beginning to take the changing places on, but there are still a substantial part of the population who can‘t do the things so many of us take for granted. some real difficulties there. joining us now from glasgow is dr lisa cameron mp, the chair of the all—party parliamentary group for disability. thank you forjoining us. they
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recently have been talking about this is because of what happened to this is because of what happened to this paralympian, anne wafula strike, who was forced to wet herself in her wheelchair because there was no disabled toilet available. what do you make of what happened to her? is it acceptable? of course not. i think it actually shows from her story the real hurdles that face our paralympian is in people with disabilities right across the united kingdom every day of the week in accessing public services. it is not acceptable is something we need to herald change for in parliament and it will form the next focus of our inquiry report in this parliamentary term and the all—party parliamentary group. in this parliamentary term and the all-party parliamentary group. we saw the real there from parents having to change their children on the floor in public toilets —— real difficulty. should that be happening? it should not. it is not hygienic for people. it should be a
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basic human right to access a toilet. we are marginalising and excluding people with disability from everyday services that other people just expect to be there. that copyright. it can‘t be right in 2017, and i think we need to ensure this year is the year we deliver it for people with disability —— that can‘t be right. for people with disability —— that can't be right. we heard in that report the real difficulties councils are facing with funding. he should be responsible? pressure the money come from for the sort of facilities? -- approved. it has to be supported by government. i will be supported by government. i will be pushing with the uk government in terms of debate in parliament and also in terms of the independent inquiry report. and the equalities act, it is incumbent upon companies who provide services to make sure they make reasonable adjustments, and do we think it is reasonable for people with disability to be able to access it is reasonable for people
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with disability to be able to access a taller in 2017? i think it is. we need to work together and make sure across business and the public sector and government that we are singing the same tune and are actually delivering for people with disability. you say companies that provide services. what you mean and how would you enforce that? what we have to do, companies including public transport companies, including companies who employ people with disability. this is another issue that it feeds in as a vicious cycle because people with disability can‘t access public transport, they can‘t access buildings where they can go to work, then we are excluding an marginalising them. it does not make economic sense because public transport companies are actually excluding a huge part of the population that could contribute to the economic development of society and of their company. similarly, we need to have the disability employment gap, which is huge across this country. in terms of the work
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we are doing, it links together. we can‘t exclude people with disability. we need to herald change right across the united kingdom and make sure it is not a postcode lottery. make sure we support changing places, which is doing fantastic work in ensuring people can have access to basic facilities such as toilets. but we need to be doing much more. lisa, thank you for your time on bbc breakfast this morning. thank you. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: it has wowed vistors in london for more than a 100 years, but dippy the dinosaur is set to roam again. we all love dippy. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the natural history museum. it is always such a site when you see it as well. good morning. good morning. dippy has been here since 1905, since 1979 the dinosaur has beenin 1905, since 1979 the dinosaur has been in the main entrance hall. but it is about to be dismantled today
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before a uk tour gets under way. 292 pieces. it is a cast replica of an actual dinosaur skeleton. these are not fossilised bones, however it is probably one of the most famous exhibits in any museum in the uk if not the world. it is featured in films and millions of people, some 90 million visitors, it is thought, have stood here and look dead dippy over the last 100 or so years. anyway, how do dismantle an object of this size safely —— looked at. we will be finding out later. first, the news, travel and weather way you are. “— the news, travel and weather way you are. —— where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the head of lloyd‘s of london says the insurance giant will announce "within months" where it will create a new european base following brexit. lloyd‘s insurance market has traded in the capital for more than 300 years, but is now finalising contingency plans to move staff to a subsidiary office, depending on the government‘s
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negotiations with the eu. we‘ve got to have people physically in another country looking after that business, whereas previously they would have been based in london. that is only a small proportion for lloyd‘s, but if other businesses have to follow suit, that means there will be people based outside of london. but i‘m sure london will still remain the global heart of insurance globally. an appeal is due to be held in an iranian court today against the imprisonment of a woman from hampstead, who‘s been locked up there since march last year. nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who‘s a british iranian charity worker, is accused of plotting against the iranian government. but her husband says that‘s nonsense. he claims his wife is being used as a bargaining chip in a diplomatic row. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is running normally, it seems, this morning, but a reminder that transport
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for london‘s rail service is suspended between brentwood and shenfield till may for works. southern trains still have a disrupted service because of strike action. let‘s take a look at the a1 holloway road — it‘s closed near upper holloway station for works for the next few days. meanwhile, it‘s going to be busy round there as part of the diversion route, tufnell park road, is partly blocked by a burst water main. and we‘ve got another burst water main in ickenham. breakspear road south is closed because of flooding. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. a milder morning follows a milder night. a little bit damp for some of us as well. we have a cloudy start through the day. some outbreaks of rain. they should be fairly short—lived, and not all of us will see them. fairly light rain where they do fall. that cloud should melt away early today and leave us with beautiful winter sunshine. temperatures up to seven or eight degrees, possibly even above that. under the clear skies tonight, the temperatures fall away pretty quickly, and we are expecting a widespread frost. probably some fog patches, and freezing fog is a possibility. possibly —2 degrees or lower, especially in more rural parts.
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it is a frosty and icy start tomorrow. worth leaving extra time if you are travelling anywhere to scrape your windscreen. lots of sunshine on the way, with highs of five celsius. still feeling cold in the sunshine. heading into friday, a different day altogether. much cloudier as a band of rain sinks southwards. we will not see that later on. that clears on saturday morning, leaving us with a dry weekend with sunny spells and feeling slightly milder as well. those temperatures reaching double figures again. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. to challenge what he called muddled
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thinking and ill—founded arguments. downing street won‘t comment, except to say that "sir ivan is free to express his own opinions." earlier we spoke to shadow secretary of state for international trade — barry gardiner. what we now need is to ensure that whoever it is that replaces sir ivan is someone with an equally distinguished record of public service. i hate seeing the civil service. i hate seeing the civil service either politicised or turned into" yes" people. i think we need someone into" yes" people. i think we need someone with a stiff the —— distinguish record as sir ivan did
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and has a fundamental grasp of how our partners in europe will be thinking. we need the best dealfor the uk. meanwhile, the uk‘s countryside and wildlife could suffer post brexit, according to a cross party committee of mps. farmers could also face a loss of subsidies according to the report by the environmental audit committee. it calls for new laws to ensure existing protections for farming are not weakened once britain leaves the eu. the government says it is committed to safeguarding and improving them. former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides emergency cover for the nhs, say they were given just an hour‘s training to drive under blue lights. a company based in essex called the ‘private ambulance service‘ is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times. the company says the level of training of its staff exceeds the required standards. there‘s more on this on the victoria derbyshire programme from 9:00 on bbc two. 0verfive million people in the uk currently receive treatment
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for asthma, but up to two thirds of them are not being given the care needed to manage their condition. asthma uk, which commissioned the research, says that in 2015, 1,500 people died from the disease, the highest number in a decade. the charity says both the nhs and people with asthma must take joint responsibility for their health. west yorkshire police have carried out further searches overnight after a man was shot and killed by officers during a pre—planned operation. yassar yaqub died on monday evening, after police in unmarked vehicles stopped a carjust off the m62 in huddersfield. the independent police complaints commission is probing the discovery of a gun in mr yaqub‘s car. it‘s being reported that the convicted mass murderer, charles manson, has been taken to hospital. media reports say that manson, who is in his eighties, has been moved to a hospital about an hour away from the state prison where he is being held.
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manson, who was sentenced to life in prison, directed his followers to murder seven people in august 1969. an earthquake was detected 100 miles from scarborough last night. the british geological survey says the tremor, which was in the north sea, happened just before seven o‘clock yesterday evening and had a magnitude of 3.8. nobody is so far claiming that they felt it. heroes come in all shapes and sizes, including extra small in this instance — and before we show you these pictures of a chest of drawers falling on to a two year old child, we must say that he‘s 0k! brock shoff was playing in the bedroom. after the drawers fell on him, his twin brother, bowdy, showed an impressive amount of strength and cool—headed action and rescued him. the boys parents have released
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the footage to highlight concerns over the safety of children and tall furniture. it is grim to watch, isn‘t it? sally winces every time she sees it. it is awful, isn‘t it. he is ok. he is ok. cctv in the room? is that a thing now? it‘s an american thing. i would go for a human in the room. absolutely. if you look at the comments underneath, a lwa ys you look at the comments underneath, always interesting.
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i will show you a very clever celebration soon. a remarkable comeback from arsenal last night who scored three goals in the last 20 minutes to earn a 3—3 draw at bournemouth. eddie howe‘s side were in complete control as they led 3—0, ryan fraser scoring their third goal, but arsenal fought back and a stoppage—time header from 0livier giroud completed the turnaround. a little celebration by 0livier giroud. a reference to his kicks the other day against crystal palace. if i tried to celebrate a goal like that, it would be twang. let‘s not do that, then. a 2—1win at crystal palace moved swansea city off the bottom of the premier league table on the day they made paul clement their new head coach. the former derby boss watched from the dugout in the second half
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as swansea won their first game in nearly a month. angel rangel scored the winner two minutes from time to lift the swans to within a point of safety. mike phelan is the latest premier league manager to be sacked with his hull city side bottom of the premier league. phelan replaced steve bruce on a temporary basis before the start of the season and was appointed permanently in october. despite winning their opening two league games, hull have won just once since. world number 0ne sir andy murray has got 2017 off to a winning start after reaching the second round of the qatar 0pen. the two—time champion in doha comfortably dispatched france‘s jeremy chardy in straight sets. he‘ll play austrian gerald melzer in round two. england rugby union head coach eddiejones says dylan hartley will captain england during the six nations, so long as he proves his fitness. hartley is currently serving a suspension after being sent off for club side northampton. his six week ban will end before england play france early next month.
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he is doing everything right to be captain at the moment. he has come to the camps, worked hard, a prerequisite to get into the england side is to be very fit. not playing games. he needs to undergo an extremely stringent fitness programme “— extremely stringent fitness programme —— programme over the next 5-6 programme —— programme over the next 5—6 weeks. he is putting himself in the best position to continue as captain. gb taekwondo say they have reservations about double 0lympic champion jade jones taking part in the channel a programme thejump, following serious injuries to some competitors on last year‘s show. jones, who receives funding from uk sport, has been spoken to about the risks involved in the programme, which teaches people to ski jump. cyclist sir bradley wiggins and paralympian kadeena cox are among the figures from sport also taking part. lots of people taking part. braver souls than me. thanks, sal. you are welcome. thank
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you very much. how many times have you heard your other half say, go on, have another drink? possibly a couple. when many of us have resolved to have a dry january it‘s frustrating. especially for women with research suggesting men are the instigators. the campaign group drinkaware say couples are key to supporting each other if one of them wants to cut down on the booze. but how easy is it in practice? i think if your wife stops drinking, you have to do the right thing, haven‘t you? you have to do the right thing, haven't you? having to challenge myself rather than, you know, get the other person to manage their own drinking habits. ijust usually do it for my own well— being and all the ijust usually do it for my own well—being and all the rest of it,
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just did lose a bit of weight and get healthy. i do try and help you but i do put down as well. 100%, you but i do put down as well. 10096, you would completely support me. definitely cost of a going to tell me to do it? i gave up for seven yea rs me to do it? i gave up for seven years and you still drink. i think if one of us was going to do it, we were both have to do it so we we re it, we were both have to do it so we were both as in it as each other. in the past, it has helped us a lot doing things together. i would advise anyone else, definitely, do it as advise anyone else, definitely, do itasa advise anyone else, definitely, do it as a couple. you have got each other's back. it helps. some tricky conversations. let‘s find out if this couple agree. reverand kate bottley and her husband graham join us now, along with the research and insight manager of the charity drinkaware, andrew russell. you might have seen on a certain tv programme. i've never seen before!
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what was found in this report is that women are pressurised sometimes by their partners, perhaps men, into having another drink. is that what happens? look at his face! it's not always tea. what we find in our marriage is it seems to go as a pair. if one of us is having a glass of wine, the other one would have a glass of wine as well. you sort of encouragement it will. you agree? yes. you started to measure out your drinks in the little thing you bought, just to make sure you're not just a slugging it all in at once. is that a practical response? this is clearly an issue. it makes us sound like massive drinkers. we are not. like most people, a lot of us do stressfuljobs and a glass of
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wine is normal. you reach for the wine. what we have in our house is a measure. instead ofjust pouring it in and pouring the next one, you can measure it so you can be more aware. what is the research telling us? we did a big survey of people in couples were at least one person was drinking over the guideline. about 60%, both people are drinking over and the egg each other on but there it isa and the egg each other on but there it is a big chunk of men who say actually, i am the guy who is saying, do you want another glass? they are the ones pushing the extra drink. there are 30% of women who say that they would drink less if it weren't for their partners. if you, for example, and! weren't for their partners. if you, for example, and i imagine lots of us would be attempting a dry january, how helpful is that if you are both dry question mark it helps if you have the mutual support. --
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if you have the mutual support. -- if you have the mutual support. -- if you are both dry? we have an app so if you are both dry? we have an app so you if you are both dry? we have an app so you can if you are both dry? we have an app so you can track how much you are drinking so you can see those days where you lose willpower and that's when you want your partner to step in and say, yes, gifted that you weren't going to be drinking will stopjust be that weren't going to be drinking will stop just be that little voice of conscience to keep you on the straight and narrow. —— yes, you did say. we have to support one another because we are as bad as it is each other, you said simon. isabel says, if we tell people we don‘t eat meat there is no issue that if you don‘t wa nt to there is no issue that if you don‘t want to drink alcohol people become self entitled bullies and try to shove drinking culture down your throat. what comes from those couples is when —— comments is when couples is when —— comments is when couples help each other out, it helps. in any marriage, you should be each other‘s‘ biggest encourage a. —— encouragement. when you make the
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vows, —— encouragement. when you make the vows , you —— encouragement. when you make the vows, you promise to support each other as much as you can and i would say you are probably my greatest encouragement and also my harshest critic. it is important that you have a drink when you are the one who is there, no secret tipples. it is our kids that are our worst critics sometimes. it can be the whole family that help each other as long as you are open about what you are drinking. that will help you manage it. you make a good point. i suppose everybody can be involved in the described —— discussion. suppose everybody can be involved in the described —— discussionm suppose everybody can be involved in the described -- discussion. it was definitely a family thing, come on, dad. we had a guy put sellotape over the lead of the ring pull so every time you went, home, beer, fridge, drink. it was, hang on. they need to think about it and then it stopped.
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is there a sticker on your biscuit tin? i'm asking for a friend. thank you very much. are you going to try and do dryjuly? you very much. are you going to try and do dry july? i think total abstinence won‘t work but we are doing less. shirt of the year so far, man. was that a christmas present? yes. let‘s catch up with the weather. some icy blue hues, carol is talking about. for the next 24 hours, some sunshine, but tonight in particular, a widespread frost away from the coast. today we have a weather front sinking southwards taking a band of cloud with and patchy rain and drizzle. in that northerly flow behind it, it will turn colder. as the front continues to drift towards
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the front continues to drift towards the south—west, the court ed dickson behind it at the skies were clear. the other thing we have behind it is a keen northerly wind coming down the north sea coastline —— the cold air. we could see some rain showers getting in across norfolk. brightening through the course of the day with some sunshine except for where the weather front is in the south—west. the vodafone will be thick enough to produce the odd spot of light rain or drizzle —— weather front. some of us will see sunshine when it breaks up. into east anglia through london up towards the midlands, again, some sunshine. it will feel cold and you will need to wrap up warm, especially if you are travelling or walking on the shoreline down the north sea coastline. sunshine prevails across much of scotland apart from shetland and aberdeenshire, where we could see wintry showers. brightening across much of northern ireland, albeit the south will be the last to brighton. as the front continues to
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drift towards the south—west, it will brighten from north wales, and he is the weather front producing the cloud and patchy rain across the south—west. as we head into the evening and overnight, the temperature will drop rapidly. there will be a widespread frost. in towns and cities, the temperatures will be pretty low. —2 minus three. where we have the figure cloud, temperatures holding upa have the figure cloud, temperatures holding up a little more. in rural areas, it will feel better. widespread frost. maybe a little too much dry airfor ice in the morning, but there could be freezing fog patches. we do not expect that to be too problematic either. tomorrow, a fine day with their sunshine around. feeling cold with the wind got a strong and is. late in the day, a weather front from the west accompanied by some rain and also windy conditions. 0ne accompanied by some rain and also windy conditions. one thing you will notice is as it heads further south on friday, the weather will turn that bit milder. thank you very much. see you later. cold one the
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way. you like a bit of cold, do you? high street retailer next says its christmas wasn‘t so festive after reporting a fall in sales. shall i explain? santa didn‘t deliver a sales boost for next. and we watch next closely because it‘s seen as an indicator of how well the high street is doing. figures just out show that sales in the run up to christmas fell 0.4% compared to the same time last year. it was shop sales that fell the most, but they were propped up by better online sales. but as well as a disappointing christmas, the firm has warned that inflation could squeeze our income next year, and we‘ll have less money in our pockets. they‘ve also said they might have to raise prices in stores by up to 5% because of the weak pound. let‘s discuss this. kirsty mcgregor is from drapers magazine. those are the figures from next, the
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first one to tell us how they fared over christmas. what does it tell us about the state of the high street this christmas? it is a worrying sign from next this morning. they tend to be a bit of a bellwether for the high street. i think we will see a few more trading statements like this same christmas was disappointing, and it is not good news. christmas is the key period for all retailers when they expect to see a boost in sales. what are the interesting things if you delve into their statement? even be after christmas sales, normally they would expect to flog things more cheaply and people will buy it. those sales fell significantly, down by 7%. does it suggest people bought before christmas and said, ok, i am not buying any more, and in the new year it will be tough? next took a gamble keeping things full price in the run—up to christmas. that is what they usually do. they usually use
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they usually do. they usually use the cells to try to get people into the cells to try to get people into the shops afterwards. it does not seem the shops afterwards. it does not seem to have paid off that strategy this year. we are seeing an underlying move away from spending so much muggy on clothing and footwear. people seem to be spending more on going out and technology and things like that —— money. more on going out and technology and things like that -- money. they have also one of price rises next year. a lot of firms have said prices could start rising next year as well. there is this double whammy. they touched on inflation. things are coming through means we have less money in our pockets and wage growth is not keeping up. at the same time prices are rising. we all feel the squeeze in the new year?|j prices are rising. we all feel the squeeze in the new year? i think we will. they initially said 5% price rise would be the worst case scenario this year, but i think it is looking likely now. i suspect we will see with people like next, who play in the value space, they will try to keep the low end prices down and perhaps just raise try to keep the low end prices down and perhapsjust raise prices towards the end of the bracket, the upper end. but it will be a tough
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year, and! upper end. but it will be a tough year, and i think people will be spending less on clothing. with that in mind, what can retailers do to persuade us to get through the doors? as you said, maybe we are spending less on clothing and maybe more on going out, but even then, if we have less money in our pockets, had do they persuade us to part with that money? it is having a strong multichannel strategy, making sure your website is top notch. we will see with a lot of retailers, if you have a good website, online sales will probably prop things up. a great website and making sure you have the right stories in the right locations. and try to do something a little bit exciting that makes people want to come into the shops rather than to shop online. yes, a familiar tale. thank you so much. remember, next week, another busy week as far as retail figures are concerned. morrisons, john lewis, sainsbury‘s, m&s, tesco, primark, debenham‘s and asos. that‘ll keep me busy next week. that'll keep me busy next week. all to look forward to.
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dinosaurs haven‘t roamed the earth for quite some time, but one by the name of dippy is about to embark on something of a road trip. it will travel around museums across the country, but first, there‘s the small matter of dismantling it. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is with dippy now. lots of you will be familiar with this site. such a stunning entrance to the natural history museum. good morning. a lot of people have been in touch this morning saying see in dippy has been one of the oldest memories and making them interested in science. they make ‘s been here since 1905, and in entrance all since 1979. but the dismantling process is about to get under way. dippy is living here and is going to be going on a uk tour of eight destinations, which will take just over two years. how on earth did you go about
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dismantling an object is famous, as precious as this? you will find out shortly. firstly, here are some fa cts shortly. firstly, here are some facts and figures about dippy delivered by visitors to the museum. # everybody walk the dinosaur # open the door, get on the floor # everybody walk the dinosaur. ..#. dippy is 21 metres long and made up of 292 bones. dippy is a plaster cast replica of a skeleton found in wyoming in the usa in 1988. -- anti- —— anti— 90 eight. —— 1898. dippy has been viewed by more than 90 million visitors. dippy will be going on a two—year tour around the uk and will be replaced here by the skeleton of a blue whale. we are a little sad because dippy sort of feels like an old friend, part of the family. # i walked a dinosaur #. it gives people an opportunity to see an amazing dinosaur that
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perhaps they would not be able to see at all. # open the door, get on the floor # everybody walk the dinosaur. ..#. lorraine, you have the somewhat vast task of dismantling dippy and taking dippy on a tour. where'd you begin? i know tomorrow morning, we start by taking the glass barrier down, and then starting at the tail, we will ta ke then starting at the tail, we will take the title. it is bit like i‘m dreading a string of pearls. each one of those vertebrae come off. then the head, and then the middle section. —— inet threading. we have looked at the metalwork and we can
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see where the bolts unscripted we are going to very carefully take it apart. we have some pictures, so we think we know what we are doing. but you can never tell. we have 3.5 weeks to take dippy down. if you look at the neck end, they are ca bles look at the neck end, they are cables hanging from the ceiling. we have to disconnect that. there is a lot of big about. dippy is about to go on lot of big about. dippy is about to goona lot of big about. dippy is about to go ona uk lot of big about. dippy is about to go on a uk tour of eight destinations. they should be coming up destinations. they should be coming up on the screen now. how did you choose where dippy would go on show? a lot of people applied and we looked carefully. the eight venues spread around the uk represent a really good place for them to go. they are going to meet up with local museums and schools, and they will do fantastic events. we will reach millions more people, people who do not necessarily get down to london. and they will explore nature in their own region. the uk has an amazing diversity of natural and we wa nt amazing diversity of natural and we want people to engage with their own region. dippy is our ambassador for
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that. lorraine, from everybody on ourteam, that. lorraine, from everybody on our team, good at. that. lorraine, from everybody on ourteam, good at. it that. lorraine, from everybody on our team, good at. it is quite a process. it will take several weeks. —— good luck. then dippy will say goodbye to the natural history museum after 100 years, but a blue whale will replace them act in this space. it is fantastic. just like doing an enormous dinosaur shaped puzzle. we will be back later as well. that is a big job. do not lose a piece. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: you have a dry cleaning label hanging off the back of your dress. when was the last time at yours was cleaned? the pacy and provocative police show no offence returns to our screens tonight. joanna scanlon will tell us how her character copes trying to prevent a gang war breaking out. it sounds exciting. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you at eight o‘clock. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the head of lloyd‘s of london says
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the insurance giant will announce "within months" where it will create a new european base following brexit. lloyd‘s insurance market has traded in the capital for more than 300 years, but is now finalising contingency plans to move staff to a subsidiary office, depending on the government‘s negotiations with the eu. the chief executive, inga beale, told bbc london that could have a ripple effect for other companies. we‘ve got to have people physically in another country looking after that business, whereas previously they would have been based in london. that is only a small proportion for lloyd‘s, but if other businesses have to follow suit, that means there will be people based outside of london. but i‘m sure london will still remain the global heart of insurance globally. an appeal is due to be held in an iranian court today against the imprisonment of a woman from hampstead, who‘s been locked up there since march last year. nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, who‘s a british iranian charity worker, is accused of plotting against the iranian government. but her husband says that‘s nonsense. he claims his wife is being used
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as a bargaining chip in a diplomatic row. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is running normally, it seems, this morning, but a reminder that transport for london‘s rail service is suspended between brentwood and shenfield till may for works. southern trains still have a disrupted service because of strike action. let‘s take a look at the a1 holloway road — it‘s closed near upper holloway station for works for the next few days. meanwhile, it‘s going to be busy round there as part of the diversion route, tufnell park road, is partly blocked by a burst water main. and we‘ve got another burst water main in ickenham. breakspear road south is closed because of flooding. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. a milder morning follows a milder night. a little bit damp for some of us as well. we have a cloudy start to the day. some outbreaks of rain. they should be fairly short—lived, and not all of us will see them. fairly light rain where they do fall.
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that cloud should melt away early today and leave us with beautiful winter sunshine. temperatures up to seven or eight degrees, possibly even above that. under the clear skies tonight, the temperatures fall away pretty quickly, and we are expecting a widespread frost. probably some fog patches, and freezing fog is a possibility. possibly —2 degrees or lower, especially in more rural parts. it is a frosty and icy start tomorrow. worth leaving extra time if you are travelling anywhere and to scrape your windscreen. lots of sunshine on the way, with highs of five celsius. still feeling cold in the sunshine. heading into friday, a different day altogether. much cloudier as a band of rain sinks southwards. we will not see that later on. that clears on saturday morning, leaving us with a dry weekend with sunny spells and feeling slightly milder as well. those temperatures reaching double figures again. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the british ambassador to the eu tells his staff to challenge "muddled thinking" about brexit, a day after he quit his job early. sir ivan rogers strongly criticised the government‘s preparations for leaving the eu saying senior ministers needed to hear what he called "uncomfortable" views. good morning. it‘s wednesday 4th january. also this morning: after a paralympian wet herself on a train because the disabled toilet was out of action, the government tells breakfast it will tighten up the rules around
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facilities for disabled people. men are more likely to disrupt their partner‘s attempts to tackle a dryjanuary according to a survey by charity drinkaware. disappointing christmas sales reported at high street retailer next. it is sales fell in the run—up to christmas and they slumped in the new new year sales. i‘ll have all the details. in sport, a fantastic comeback from arsenal who were 3—0 down with 20 minutes left at bournemouth. they went on to draw 3—0. arsenal stay fourth in the table. did he has been on display here at the natural history museum since 1905, but is about to be dismantled. about to go on a uk tour. how do you ta ke about to go on a uk tour. how do you take aparta about to go on a uk tour. how do you take apart a 292 boned skeletons safely? we will be finding out
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later. here is carol with the weather. for england and wales it is cloudy start with patchy light rain, except in the north where we have clear skies. frosty with some sunshine and in northern ireland, you have a bit of both, some bright spells and sunshine, but there is a keen wind down the north sea coastline. i will put all of that together 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. britain‘s outgoing ambassador to the european union, sir ivan rogers, has strongly criticised the government‘s preparations for brexit. in his resignation letter he said he didn‘t know what ministers‘ negotiating objectives were and called on his colleagues to challenge what he called muddled thinking. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale, reports. sir ivan rogers has been britain‘s ambassador to the eu for three years, and his criticisms about the government‘s preparations for brexit will be hard to ignore. in his resignation e—mail, he says there is a short supply of...
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and he says... he reveals that even he does not know what the government‘s negotiating objectives for brexit will be. but it is sir ivan‘s implicit and thinly veiled criticism of ministers that is most telling. he urges fellow officials never to be afraid to speak truth to power, and to challenge what he calls muddled thinking and ill—founded arguments. he says they should support each other in difficult moments when they have to deliver messages that are disagreeable to those who need to hear them. so, sir ivan‘s charge is a serious one — that the government isn‘t ready for brexit and it is ignoring the advice of its diplomats. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. how significant and potentially
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damaging might this be? very significant for the following reasons. certainly, you would expect the eu ambassador should be fundamentally diplomatic in his approach. but the resignation letter from sir ivan rodgers was far from diplomatic. he simply could have saidi diplomatic. he simply could have said i am standing aside and get someone said i am standing aside and get someone else in place before negotiations begin in earnest. he went, he went much further than that. so far this is serious, because not only is he criticising the government‘s approach, there is no timetable or process in place to choose his successor, just months before these crucial negotiations begin. what should have been a diplomatic job, begin. what should have been a diplomaticjob, a civil servicejob has now become highly political. we believe campaigners arguing they wa nt believe campaigners arguing they want someone who believes in brexit
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to be in that position. that puts pressure on theresa may over who that should be. whoever takes that job will be under scrutiny as well. we have heard what sir ivan rodgers thinks of a lack of experience in negotiating and we might be outmanoeuvred by the european committee. it will be serious if theresa may cannot get the right candidate for thejob. theresa may cannot get the right candidate for the job. but the most serious thing in that letter is this, after seven months, the person who should be in the know, the ambassador to the eu still isn‘t clear what the negotiating objectives are for leaving the european union. though theresa may says brexit means brexit, the most senior man in brussels until yesterday, doesn‘t know what brexit means. thank you. meanwhile, the uk‘s countryside and wildlife could suffer post brexit, according to a cross party committee of mps. farmers could also face a loss of subsidies according to the report by the environmental audit
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committee. it calls for new laws to ensure existing protections for farming are not weakened once britain leaves the eu. the government says it is committed to safeguarding and improving them. former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides emergency cover for the nhs, say they were given just an hour‘s training to drive under blue lights. a company based in essex called the ‘private ambulance service‘ is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times. the company says the level of training of its staff exceeds the required standards. there‘s more on this on the victoria derbyshire programme from 9:00 on bbc two. two thirds of asthma patients in the uk aren‘t receiving the basic care needed to manage their condition according to research by charity asthma uk, they say that although the figures are slightly better than a year ago, almost 3.5 million people are still at risk. the charity has warned that this failing could "cost lives" as michelle roberts reports. being on the right medication and knowing how to use it is vital if you have asthma.
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so too is having regular check—ups and getting tailored advice on how to manage your condition. this year‘s annual asthma care survey shows most people with asthma aren‘t receiving this basic care, that‘s around 3.6 million people in the uk. in 2015 in the uk, nearly 1,500 people died from asthma attacks, the highest level in a decade. according to asthma uk, two in every three asthma deaths could be avoided with better care. most patients think the care they receive is satisfactory or excellent, but few get the full package of basic care. nhs england says every asthma patient should be supported to manage their condition and offered regular reviews. and it‘s notjust medical staff who need to do more, according to asthma uk, who say people with asthma must take responsibility
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for their own care too. west yorkshire police have carried out further searches overnight after a man was shot and killed by officers during a pre—planned operation. yassar yaqub, died on monday evening, after police in unmarked vehicles stopped a carjust off the m62 in huddersfield. phil bodmer is close to where the shooting happened. phil what is the latest in this investigation? the m62 junction 24 westbound finally reopened last night. just over 24 hours after it was closed following the fatal shooting of 28—year—old yassar yaqub, a father of two from huddersfield. the investigation is being handled by
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the independent police complaints in. they say they are making good progress but it is a complex investigation and it might take some time. they are appealing for people to be patient. police officers stopped a number cars on sunday night, including a white audi. the investigation is focusing on that and also the shooting of yassar yaqub is very much part of that investigation, trying to find out the circumstances leading up to that. what we know is police undertook a number of searches in the huddersfield area last might. officers are not being specific about the precise locations. also, a spontaneous process, one in leeds last night. some of them were peaceful protest. officers were deployed to make sure those protests remained peaceful. we have heard one police van was attacked with stones
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and some officers were attacked. although we have to get that officially confirmed. there is a postmortem being carried out today on the victim. we should find out more about that later. meanwhile, five people remain in custody, being questioned about this incident. thank you very much. it‘s being reported that the convicted mass murderer, charles manson, has been taken to hospital. media reports say that manson, who is in his 80s, has been moved to a hospital about an hour away from the state prison where he is being held. manson, who was sentenced to life in prison, directed his followers to murder seven people in august 1969. an earthquake was detected 100 miles from scarborough last night. the british geological survey says the tremor, which was in the north sea, happened just before 7:00pm yesterday evening and had a magnitude of 3.8. somewhere near there. i need one of
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those pointers. a couple who were forced to spend the night in the scottish cairngorms have spoken of their relief at being rescued. robert and cathy elmer were reported missing on sunday night and sheltered in a bivvy bag before rescuers reached them the following day. yesterday, another man was saved from the mountain range, their fourth call—out this year. janet jackson‘s given birth to her first child. the younger sister of michaeljackson, who is 50, has named her son, eissa. she is said to have had a stress—free delivery. the singer stopped a world tour last april, telling her fans she was planning a family with her husband. she has now achieved that goal. 2017 should be the year of change for people with disabilities. rules are looking to be tightened for access. all this is revealed after a
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paralympian access. all this is revealed after a pa ralympian wet herself access. all this is revealed after a paralympian wet herself in a wheelchair because her train didn‘t have a working disabled toilet. but lisa cameron told us it was unacceptable. it should be a basic human right to be able to access a toilet. we are marginalising and excluding people with disability from everyday services that other people just expect to be there. that cannot be right, it cannot be right in 2017 and i think we need to make sure this year is the year we deliver for people with disability. the government has told as it is looking at better ways to ensure there are more disabled toilets available. later today, campaigners are talking about having better changing facilities for quarter of a million people in the uk who needs them. nicky fox has more on this. spending a day at the shops is something so many of us do. but for maria and ryan, it is not a
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pleasurable experience. ryan is autistic and needs a bathroom that has the right amount of space and equipment to allow his mum to change him. but there aren‘t that many around. would you be prepared to put your child, your mum or your sister on the floor to change them if they we re on the floor to change them if they were still wearing nappies? it is this kind of problem that affects at least a quarter of a million people in the uk. this woman can look after her son adam at home because she has all of the kit she needs. but it is a whole different matter when they leave the house. it is 1.5 hours‘ round trip to find a suitable public toilet. how does that impact you? very hard. we can‘t go out for a full day in bury. but there is an answer. a fully—accessible bathroom like this. the bathroom of dreams!
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there are only 900 of these changing places across the uk. it is absolutely huge. it is the creme de la creme of bathrooms. when i came in here withjosh, my son, when he was alive, the first thing would be to bring the ceiling track hoist over. but before it opened, dawn would have to change josh on toilet floors. that isjust disgusting. you don't change people on the floor. my son obviously had been through chemo. he had a massive infection risk. at the end of this life, for the last two years, he was severely oxygen dependent. shortly before he died, josh opened this facility. it meant he could rest his spine, which was really important for us, because it meant he could continue to go out and experience life. it has taken four years for maria to secure the funding for a changing places toilet in her local shopping centre in crawley. they are not cheap, coming in at around £18,000. there is currently no legal
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obligation to provide one. councils say cuts to funding mean they have had to make tough choices about public facilities. but they are working with local businesses to try to tackle the problem. it is not looking much from outside at the moment, but this is where the crawley changing place will be. they have every right to be able to toilet in the correct way. so to have this facility is giving them their basic human rights of being able to go to the toilet in public, but safely, securely, hygienically, and dignified. there is no easy route to getting a changing places toilet. towns and cities are beginning to take the changing places on, but there are still a substantial part of the population who can‘t do the things so many of us take for granted. lots of you have been getting in contact with us about this. donna says, everybody is one step
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away from being the person who needs to use these toilets, or they may be isolated at home. neil says, i have complete sympathy, but at a cost of £18,000, can we expect local authorities or private businesses to supply them, however much we wish for them? somebody else says, what about a corporate social responsibility? joanne says, our shopping centre has won awards, the disabled toilet is massive with wales and a large changing table. howerd says, he transported two disabled family members around 1200 miles, he says everywhere they went the disabled toilets doubled as a baby changing room, and families used them, a lack of paper, generally pretty grim. as
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for hoists and adult sized changing tables, they did not seek them at all. he said we live in the stone age. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or contact us through our facebook page. and you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcbreakfast. we have a milder weekend ahead. you have been paying attention! but we have cold weather to get through first. it is a cold start today, but this cold night will be even colder, with a widespread frost. the weather front is producing cloud and patchy rain and drizzle, and it will continue to push towards the south—west. cold air is "in. as it pushes further south, you will find the push of cold air getting further south as well. we have a keen
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northerly wind. we will see showers coming inland of the north sea, if you of them in shetland and aberdeenshire will be wintry, but they will be rain showers as they push into norfolk. it brightens up this afternoon. the weather front moves towards the south—west. there will be some holes in the cloud, some sunshine coming through and patchy rain. the rain is fairly hit and miss. as we move north, through the midlands, towards northern england, blue skies. more cloud towards the coast. fairly windy. as we move towards the coast. fairly windy. as we m ove a cross towards the coast. fairly windy. as we move across scotland and into northern ireland, a fair bit of cloud. the cloud will clear the south of northern ireland last. and the south of wales. into the south—west, we also have the cloud and patchy light rain and drizzle. as we head through wednesday evening
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and overnight, look at this blew across the chart, indicating temperatures that are freezing or below. a widespread frost. in the countryside, peter bridges will be a lot lower tha n countryside, peter bridges will be a lot lower than that. there might be some patchy fog forming. if that happens, it will be freezing fog. after the cold start, we are looking ata after the cold start, we are looking at a lot of sunshine and dry weather. the remnants of the weather front still affecting temperature, south—west england, possibly the west of northern ireland. then the next system is waiting in the wings. through thursday into friday, that will be slowly slipping south. it will be slowly slipping south. it will be slowly slipping south. it will be windy around it as well. before it arrives, we will look at frost, possibly the risk of ice as well, and also fog. the fog forming
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more readily as we move into friday. behind the rain, brighter sky and a cue showers, leading us into a milder weekend. fairly settled, cloudy, a bit of rain at times, but we will see more coming into the northwest on sunday. i always pay attention to carol‘s weather, especially when i am out and about with the fa cup. next is the first high street name to release it‘s christmas sales figures — ben they‘re being viewed as a bit of a disappointment, aren‘t they? good morning, and it‘s a poor start to the festive figures. retailer next has revealed a 0.4% drop in sales in the run up to christmas compared to last year — and a 7% fall in sales of goods they‘d discounted to try
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and entice shoppers. the company has lowered its profit expectations this year as a result, but has also highlighted concerns for the coming year. the falling pound and a squeeze on our ability to spend means they company will be forced to put up prices by up to 5%. women face a rapid rise in pay inequality in their 30s and 40s, according to the resolution foundation. their research found that starting salaries for men and women have levelled out over the generations, but grows as careers progress. the researchers concluded that having children carries a "sharp and long—lasting" pay penalty. top bosses will have earned more by midday today than typical workers earn all year, according to the high pay centre think tank. they say it‘s unfair that the average salary is just over £28,000 but some execs take home an average of £4 million. the top bosses will have earned more
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than the average person earns over an entire year. a footballer‘s salary. thank you for that depressing news! a british—iranian woman who has been in solitary confinement since last march will have her appeal heard later today. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, is accused of plotting to topple the iranian government. herfamily insist she is innocent. nazinin‘s husband richard ratcliffe joins us now from their home in north london. we have talked to you before. for people who don‘t know much about her story, how did she end up being detained? nazanin went on holiday with our daughter at easter, and was picked up at the airport on the way back home and was whisked off down south and kept in solitary confinement and later charged with
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national security related issues and sentenced to five years in september. as we speak the appeal is happening, so hopefully that may be overturned. how optimistic are you that things might change?” overturned. how optimistic are you that things might change? i am terrified. it is unpredictable, what will happen. it has been fairly arbitrary all the way through. we have to wait until it has happened and the lawyer tells us, we have had limited access to nazanin at this point. it has been political all the way through. when she was taken, m essa g es way through. when she was taken, messages say that she will not be released if the british don‘t negotiate, soap anything could happen, it could be the sentence is reduced or quashed, it could be that it is increased, it could be that we don‘t know for a few weeks. i am trying to keep calm. incredibly
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frustrating and difficult position to be in. how has she been doing? she was very low before christmas, we have been campaigning hard to bring her back for christmas, and that did not happen. at some point she confessed to feeling suicidal and she went on hunger strike for a number of days, but brokered following the intervention of her family. then she was put back into solitary confinement. 0n family. then she was put back into solitary confinement. on christmas day she had a family visit, and she was told she is being moved, and she has now been moved to the general cell. it is a long journey back to trust people, but being in company makes a big difference. you cannot go there at the moment, you have not been able to get a visa? that is right. trying to get an authorisation number is where i am, it is proving to be quite confiscated, but yes, that is the
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next step from my side. your daughter has been staying with her grandparents, how is she doing? she is getting older, and she begins to ask questions, when are we going back to london, where our mummy and daddy? she talks about prison being mummy‘s bedroom. she does not understand things in the big sense and she is young enough to live in the moment, and she is in a place where she is loved. nazanin can feel the difference, she is less missing her mum and she is an iranian girl who speaks farsi. but she is safe. if it went your way today, but they be able to come back as mac ——?m she was released i would expect that we would be able to get them home very quickly, that is dominant what happens. there is a problem around
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our daughter‘s passport, but i am sure there would be ways of sorting it if nazanin is released. best of luck. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the weather is looking pretty good today, sunshine in the forecast. mild this morning. but hard frost on the way throughout the country. this is what it looks like earlier on. cloud across southern areas and across the north from the word go, it is looking pretty sunny. temperatures ranging from three or fourin temperatures ranging from three or four in scotland to eight or nine in the far south channel islands, just about scraping nine or 10 degrees. overnight, high—pressure sits on top of the uk which means the skies were clear and temperatures will drop like a stone. throughout the country, look at the frosty balloting, the blue—collar engulfing
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the uk. in towns and cities we are talking about minus two, minus three degrees. rural spots will be colder, around minus five or 6 degrees first thing on wednesday, on thursday morning. there is a frost across the country, clear skies around. beautiful day so crisp start and then a nice crisp, cold, sunny afternoon. temperatures on thursday will range from chilly but raw two or three degrees in the north down to about five or six across southern areas. change on the way towards the end of the week. the frosty high—pressure slips into the continent. we get weather fronts coming in from the atlantic which means thickening cloud and outbreaks of rain. those temperatures. to rise. double—figure temperatures across scotland. we have rain at times and it will be cloudy and
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those temperatures are rising back into double figures. that‘s it from me, have a good day. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and sally bundock. are eurozone‘s prospects beginning to inflate? in a few hours we find out if price rises in the block are back on track. live from london, that‘s our top story on wednesday 4th january. 0nwards and upwards! will inflation continue its march towards the european central bank‘s 2% target? and a clear road ahead for takata. reports suggest the japanese company could draw a line under its faulty airbags saga, but how much will it cost? we‘ll cross live to asia with the latest.
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